Communication Tips To Help Your Child Slow Down and Pay Attention

June 09, 2022

Communication Tips To Help Your Child Slow Down and Pay Attention

 

 

Since it is essential to communicate more effectively with our children, try these strategies: 

 

  • Give clear, specific directions. 
  • Try to break tasks into one or two steps so they do not feel overwhelming. 
  • Give the child choices. 
  • Ask questions instead of making statements. This forces a child to stop and think about the alternatives. 

 

Instead of requiring your child to maintain eye contact, let your child move around and/or have something in their hands (such as textured objects or fidgets) while you are speaking. This will actually increase attention and retention. 

 

Try visual and auditory reminders to keep a child on task. Use color cards (yellow for slow down, red for stop, green for go) and timers to help children turn off their video games without being asked. 

 

During temper tantrums parents should look at it as an opportunity to prove their personal integrity. You need to show them that you are in control and that everything is okay and they need to recognize that you are so emotionally strong that even their wildest tantrum cannot move you. When your child loses it, seek first to control yourself and remain calm. Parent may say: “When you are ready to talk, I’m all ears. But I can’t hear when you are screaming at me and your tantrum will not get what you want.” 

 

Communicating well with kids is essential, no matter the child’s diagnosis. If your child has ADHD or other learning or attention issues, communication can be challenging. Miscommunication and frustration can lead to tantrums. But as a parent, you can help your child learn to listen and focus with smart suggestions, statements, and questions that promote understanding. 

 

 

 

Coach Benjamin Mizrahi. Educator. Learning Specialist. Family Coach. Father. Husband.   

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